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LEARNING ACTIVITIES…

I LIKE TO CALL THEM GAMES!

(‘CAUSE DON’T WE LEARN BEST

  WHEN WE’RE HAVING FUN?)

 

ACTIVITY #1

Pip Peeks

Two Person Play: Using the I Have A Song book, the 1st player looks on the first two pages, and in their head, chooses an object to describe. After Player 1 describes the object, Player 2 looks at the pictures and guesses what it is. If Player 2 doesn’t guess correctly, Player 1 can give more clues. Player 2 is allowed to guess again. This can go on until Player 2 has correctly guessed. Now it is Player 2’s turn to be the describer. Player 2 should turn to the next pages of I Have A Song, and do as explained above. If players go through the whole book, start back at the beginning….there are lots of fun objects in this book to describe!


Small Group Play: Pip Peeks can be played in a small group. I’m picturing a small group sitting on the floor or at a table, and taking turns around the circle.

IDEAS/EXTENSION GAMES

More Fun!

Pip Peeks Memory Play: The game facilitator (picturing a fun person, like YOU!) can act as a recorder. The recorder keeps track of the objects the players guess, writing them down on a piece of paper, but not allowing the players to see the list. At the end of the game, perhaps ask the players to remember all of the items and players either create their own list or take turns, verbally, naming the items.


Pip Peeks Phonemic Awareness: Listening for beginning sounds. Using the list from “Memory Play” above, the facilitator reads the list and then asks players if there is an item that begins with the /b/ sound, for the word “ball,” for example. (The facilitator vocalizes /b/, which is the first phoneme or sound in the word “ball.”) Decide before you begin to play how players will take turns answering. Should players yell out the answers; raise their hands; jump up out of their seats…so many fun possibilities. The facilitator proceeds through the list of words.


Pip Peeks Rhyming Play: The facilitator asks players if they can think of a word that rhymes with each word from the list created from Memory Play (#2 above). For example, if the facilitator reads the first word from the list, “ball,” the facilitator asks the first player to name a word that rhymes with ball. The player may say, “hall,” “stall,” “fall,” “call,” or “wall”….you get the idea, right? FUN! Play proceeds to the next player as the facilitator reads the next word on the list and asks the 2nd player to name a rhyming word.


A little bit about phonemes: https://www.ateachableteacher.com (Phonological VS Phonemic Awareness: The Ultimate Breakdown)